BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE OF MISSION FOR THE POOR

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The problem that calls for a research

In 1996 Gauteng had a population of 7,4 million people, 48,4% of households lived in houses on a separate stand and 51,6% in informal dwellings or shacks (Census 2001). The informal settlements constitute probably the fastest growing component of the population. Most of this settlement is occurring in the metropolitan areas, but there is also rapid growth of informal settlements in medium and smaller towns in the rural areas, where a process of densification appears to be taking place in areas, which are transforming from rural into urban.

Migration to the cities

We are living in the days of incredible global massive migration. The world wide increase in population is an underlying cause of migration to the cities. The need for more jobs comes with the increase in population. This forces millions to leave their traditional rural homes and move to cities in search of employment. There are other factors. Cities offer educational opportunities that are not available in small towns and villages. Cities offer hospitals and health care centers for people with special medical needs. Young people, especially, are attracted to the cities for excitement, entertainment, and new opportunities. They often come to cities dreaming of riches and a better life, only to have their dreams destroyed by the hard realities of urban life (Greenway 1999:116).

Rural poverty

The primary driving force behind migration is the rural economy. In an increasingly cash economy, the same levels of agriculture provide declining level of effective cash. It becomes increasingly rational to migrate to the town, even if there is only a one in three or a one in two chance of getting a job. People primary migrate to the cities for economic reasons- to earn a living. When there is little rainfall, drought displaces thousands of people, forcing them to leave their villages to find work in the cities. A substantial body of research on rural-urban migration in various world regions shows
that most people move to the cities for economic reasons (Van Engen & Tiersma 1994:170).

Money

Money has increasingly become an important commodity, because it is acceptable in all social and economic transactions, including “bride price” and other traditional compensations. Today social prestige dictates the use of money to finalize the transactions (Van Engen & Tiersma 1994:171).

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 The Problem that calls for research
1.1.1 Migration to the cities
1.1.2 Push factors behind migration
1.1.2.1 Rural poverty
1.1.2.2 Weather factors
1.1.2.3 Unemployment
1.1.2.4 Money
1.1.3 Pull factors behind migration
1.2 The Purpose of the study
1.3 Research question
1.4 Methodology and some basic presupposition
.5 Definition of terms
1.5.1 The concept Strategy
1.5.2 The concept mission
1.5.3 The concept informal settlement
1.6 Key words
1.7 Overview
CHAPTER 2 BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVE OF MISSION FOR THE POOR
2.1 Introduction
2.1.1 The Poor in the Old Testament
2.1.1.1 The Poor are the Pious
2.1.1.2 The Poor as a Partial Social Grouping
2.1.1.3 The Poor as those who left all
2.2 SOME GENERAL INSIGHTS ABOUT COMPREHENSIVE MINISTRYnFOR THE POOR DERIVED FROM CERTAIN OLD TESTAMENT PASSAGES
2.2.1 God’s creation and His purpose for mankind
2.2.2 The fall of humankind and spread of sin
2.2.3 The Book of the covenant
2.2.4. The Deutoronomic Law Code
2.2.5 The Holiness Code (Leviticus 17-26)
2.2.6 The Prophetic Tradition
2.2.6.1 The Early Prophets: Amos, Hosea and Micah
2.2.6.2 The latter Prophets
2.2.6.2.1 Prophet Jeremiah
2.2.6.2.2 Prophet Nehemiah
2.2.6.2.3 Prophet Isaiah
2.2.6.2.4 Prophet Zephaniah
2.2.6.2.5 Prophet Habakkuk
2.2.6.2.6 Prophet Jonah
2.2.7. The Wisdom Literature
2.2.7.1 Psalms
2.2.7.2 The Proverbs and Ecclesiastes
2.3 SOME GENERAL INSIGHTS ABOUT COMPREHENSIVE MINISTRY FOR THE POOR DERIVED FROM CERTAIN NEW TESTAMENT PASSAGES
2.3.1 Introduction
2.3.1.1 The Poor are the sick
2.3.1.2 The Poor are the naked
2.3.1.3 The Poor are the hungry
2.3.1.4 The Poor are the destitute
2.3.2 John the Baptist
2.3.3 Jesus proclaimed the Kingdom to the poor
2.3.4 Christ’s presence among the poor
2.3.5 Jesus sending of the twelve (Luke 9:1-6)
2.3.6 The Poor and Poverty in the Church of the first century
2.3.7 The Primitive Christian community in Jerusalem
2.3.8 St. Paul and Poverty and assistance to the Poor
2.3.9 The Epistle of James
2.4 Conclusion
CHAPER 3 THE CHURCH AND THE POOR: HISTORIC OVERVIEW
3.1 Introduction
3.2 The Early Church
3.3 The Apostolic Fathers
3.4 The Old Catholic Church (150-325)
3.4.1 Tertulian
3.4.2 Clement of Alexandria (c150-215)
3.5 Post- Constantine Era (313-590 A.D)
3.5.1 Augustine
3.5.2 St. Ambrose
3.5.3 St. Basil
3.6 The Early Medieval Church (590-1300)
3.6.1 Francis of Assisi
3.6.2 Peter Valdez
3.7 The Carolingian Period: “The Economic Council”
3.8 The Bishop and the Poor: An Old Alliance
3.9 The Twelfth century
3.9.1 Monks
3.9.2 Theologians
3.9.3 Hermits
3.9.4 Apocalyptic Messiah
3.9.5 Canons and Laity
3.10 The Renaissance and the Reformation (1300-1600A.D)
3.10.1 Late Medieval Church (1300-15000)
3.10.2 Protestant Reformation
3.10.2.1 Martin Luther
3.10.2.2 John Calvin (1509-1564)
3.10.2.3 Ulrich Zwingli
3.10.2.4 Anabaptist
3.11 The Evangelical Revival Movement
3.11.1 The Pietistic Movement
3.11.2 Moravians
3.11.3 The Wesleyan Revival in England
3.11.4 The Clapham Sect
3.11.5 The First Great Awakening in North America
3.11.6 The Second Great Awakening
3.12 The Protestant Missionary Movement
3.13 Walter Rauschenbusch (1861-1918)
3.14 Missionary strategy of the 19th/ 20th Century
3.15 Liberal and Orthodox Polarization of the church
3.15.1 From Social Gospel to Salvation Today (1970-present)
3.15.2 Liberation Movement
3.15.3 A new global context for mission
3.16 Conclusion
CHAPTER 4 NECESSITY FOR A COMPREHENSIVE/ HOLISTIC APPROACH
4.1 Introduction
4.2 A Comprehensive Ministry
4.2.1 The Ministry of Evangelism and Witness
4.2.2 The Ministry Fellowship
4.2.3 The Ministry of Service
4.2.3.1 Projects and Programs
4.2.4 The Ministry of Worship
4.3 Relief
4.4 Development
4.5 A need for a comprehensive and holistic approach 2
4.6 Conclusion
CHAPTER 5 EMPIRICAL RESEARCH, DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF RESULTS
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Gathering of primary data and the sampling process
5.3 Quota sampling method
5.4 Responses
5.5 Qualitative Case study of Orange Farm community
5.5.1 Background of Orange Farm
5.5.2 The origins of Orange Farm
5.5.3 Services in Orange Farm
5.5.4 Empirical Research
5.5.4.1 Biographical information
5.5.4.2 Denomination
5.5.4.3 Community
5.5.4.4 HIV-AIDS
5.5.4.5 Abuse
5.5.4.6 Drugs
5.5.4.7 Literacy
5.5.4.8 Homelessness
5.5.4.9 Prostitution
5.6 Qualitative Research
5.6.1 Single Parenting
5.6.2 Child Adopting families
5.6.3 Orphans
5.6.4 Grand Parents
5.6.5 Child headed families
5.7 Conclusion
CHAPTER 6: DEVELOPING A MISSION STRATEGY
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Developing mission strategies
6.2.1 Networking
6.2.2 Community organization
6.2.3 Mission Strategy
6.2.4 The need for incarnational ministry
6.2.5 Understanding the community strategy
6.2.6 The need for evaluation strategy
6.2.7 Developing a Holistic Ministry
6.2.7.1 Ministering to the community of the poor
6.2.7.2 Ministering to the HIV-AIDS sufferers
6.7.2.1 HIV-AIDS ministries
6.7.2.2 Church Based Care
6.7.2.3 Inter Faith Ministries
6.2.7.3 Ministering to the Homelessness
6.2.7.4 Ministering to the victims of Abuse
6.2.7.5 Ministering to the Street Children
6.2.7.6 Ministering to the Drug addicts
6.2.7.6.1 Teach right from wrong, respect for life and law, forgiveness and mercy
6.2.7.6.2 Stand with victims and their families
6.2.7.6.3 Reach out to offenders and their families, advocate for more treatment, and provide for the pastoral needs of all involved
6.2.7.6.4 Build community
6.2.7.6.5 Advocate policies that help reduce violence, protect the innocent, involve the victims and offer real alternatives to addiction
6.2.7.7 Ministering to the Illiterates
6.2.7.8 Ministering to the Prostitutes
6.2.7.8.1 Ministry of the local church to the prostitutes
6.2.7.8.2 Creating a hospitable climate
6.2.7.8.3 Some practical ways to develop a comprehensive ministry
6.2.7.8.4 Ministry that the local church can offer
CHAPTER 7 CONCLUSION
7.1 Main conclusions
7.2 Areas of further research
BIBLIOGRAPHY

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TOWARDS A RELEVANT MINISTRY AMONG THE POOR. DEVELOPING A COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGY FOR MISSION IN INFORMAL SETTLEMENT COMMUNITIES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE ORANGE FARM COMMUNITY

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