Capability maturity models and knowledge management

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Introduction

The objective of this chapter is to serve as an overall introduction to the research report. This chapter will allow the reader to gain a high level understanding of the background to the research, the focus of the research, how the research was conducted and the structure of the research report. This chapter provides the background and context against which the research was conducted and then provides the motivation for the research which was undertaken. This includes the presentation of the research problem. The overall research design is then presented and abbreviations used in the research report are detailed. The chapter concludes with an overview of the overall layout of the research report giving a high-level view of the contents of each chapter.

Background to the research

The background to this research project is comprised of three main aspects. The first of those aspects is the growth of interest that has taken place over the last ten to fifteen years in the subject area of knowledge management (Davenport and Glaser, 2002). Over that period there has been a virtual explosion in interest in the field of knowledge management, as role players and stakeholders have sought to understand the relevance and importance of knowledge management and its relationship to organisational performance. This, in turn, has led to the publication of many books and articles on virtually every aspect of knowledge management (Davenport and Prusak, 1998; Leonard, 1995; Nonaka, 1991; Nonaka and Takeuchi, 1995; Stewart, 1997).

Context of the research

The context in which this research project was conducted had a number of aspects. The first aspect was geographic: the research was conducted in South Africa. At the time that this research project was undertaken (during 2004) South Africa, as a country, was approaching its 10th anniversary as a new democracy, and over the years since the first democratic election was held in 1994, many South African-based organisations had found themselves faced with the opportunity to measure themselves against competitors in a world market which had, prior to 1994, been in many cases partly or wholly denied to them. The post-1994 re-entry of South Africa into the global community prompted a renewed focus on the ability to survive and thrive both within the borders of the country as well as on the international stage.

Motivation for the research

Although there has been extensive discussion in the literature regarding the use of stories and storytelling as part of a knowledge management strategy, there has been no formal academic research identified which has been conducted within the context of South Africa, specifically within the mining industry.

Abstract
Acknowledgement
1 Introduction to the research report
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Background to the research
1.3 Context of the research
1.4 Motivation for the research
1.5 Problem statement
1.5.1 Sub-problem 1
1.5.2 Sub-problem 2
1.5.3 Sub-problem 3
1.5.4 Sub-problem 4
1.5.5 Sub-problem 5
1.6 Overall research design
1.7 Abbreviations
1.8 Research report chapter layout
1.8.1 Chapter 2
1.8.2 Chapter 3
1.8.3 Chapter 4
1.8.4 Chapter 5
1.8.5 Chapter 6
1.8.6 Chapter 7
1.8.7 Chapter 8
1.9 Summary
2 Knowledge and knowledge management
2.1 Introduction
2.2 What is knowledge?
2.2.1 Knowledge definition
2.2.2 Knowledge as a resource
2.3 What is knowledge management?
2.3.1 Knowledge management definition
2.3.2 Knowledge management objectives
2.3.3 Knowledge management success factors
2.3.4 Knowledge management models and frameworks
2.3.5 Knowledge management processes and sub-processes
2.3.6 Knowledge management roles
2.3.7 Knowledge management practices and tools
2.4 Knowledge management and strategy
2.4.1 Relationship between knowledge management strategy and business strategy
2.4.2 Approaches to knowledge management strategy
2.4.3 Selecting a knowledge management strategy
2.4.4 Contents of a knowledge management strategy
2.4.5 Knowledge management strategy implementation
2.5 Summary
3 Stories and storytelling
3.1 Introduction
3.2 The nature of stories and storytelling
3.2.1 The origins and definition of stories and storytelling
3.2.2 Story formats
3.2.3 The structure of stories
3.3 The use, benefits and pitfalls of stories and storytelling
3.3.1 The uses of stories in organisations
3.3.2 Benefits of the use of stories and storytelling
3.3.3 Pitfalls in the use of stories and storytelling
3.4 Models for the use of stories and storytelling
3.4.1 Review of models
3.4.2 Story-crafting
3.4.3 Story-telling
3.4.4 Story-listening
3.5 Implementing the use of stories and storytelling
3.6 Summary
4 World-class performance
4.1 Introduction
4.2 World-class performance
4.2.1 What is world-class performance?
4.2.2 World-class performance and knowledge management
4.2.3 World-class performance summary
4.3 Best practices
4.3.1 Background to best practices
4.3.2 Challenges of best practices
4.3.3 Best practices and knowledge management
4.3.4 Best practices summary
4.4 Benchmarking
4.4.1 Background to benchmarking
4.4.2 Challenges of benchmarking
4.4.3 Benchmarking and knowledge management
4.4.4 Benchmarking summary
4.5 Standards
4.5.1 Background to standards
4.5.2 Challenges of standards
4.5.3 Standards and knowledge management
4.5.4 Standards summary
4.6 Quality management
4.6.1 Background to quality management
4.6.2 Challenges of quality management
4.6.3 Quality management and knowledge management
4.6.4 Quality management summary
4.7 Capability Maturity Models
4.7.1 Background to Capability Maturity Models
4.7.2 Challenges of Capability Maturity Models
4.7.3 Capability Maturity Models and knowledge management
4.7.4 Capability Maturity Models summary
4.8 Summary
5 Research methodology
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Research philosophy
5.3 Research approaches
5.3.1 Non-empirical / empirical research
5.3.2 Qualitative / Quantitative approach
5.3.3 Deductive / Inductive
5.3.4 Subjective / objective
5.4 Research design or strategy
5.4.1 Research design alternatives
5.4.2 Case study research overview
5.4.3 Selection of the case study organisation
5.4.4 Case research data methods
5.5 Summary
6 Data findings
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Profile of the case study organisation
6.2.1 Establishment of Kumba Resources
6.2.2 Kumba Resources corporate vision and values
6.2.3 Kumba Resources business strategy
6.2.4 The Kumba Way
6.2.5 Kumba Resources operations overview
6.2.6 Performance indicators at Kumba Resources
6.3 Knowledge Management at Kumba Resources
6.3.1 Role of knowledge management in the Kumba Resources business strategy
6.3.2 Development of the knowledge management function at Kumba Resources
6.3.3 Kumba Resources knowledge management team initiatives
6.3.4 Importance of the Community of Practice to the Kumba Resources knowledge management approach
6.3.5 Continuous Improvement Community of Practice (CICOP)
6.4 Findings of the assessment of knowledge sharing and storytelling maturity in the CICOP
6.4.1 Knowledge sharing maturity in the CICOP
6.4.2 Stories and storytelling maturity in the CICOP
6.5 Findings on the use of storytelling for the sharing of knowledge in the CICOP at Kumba Resources
6.5.1 Corporate services divisions
6.5.2 Sishen iron ore mine
6.5.3 Thabazimbi iron ore mine
6.5.4 Grootegeluk coal mine
6.5.5 Leeuwpan coal mine
6.5.6 Tshikondeni coal mine
6.5.7 Rosh Pinah zinc mine
6.5.8 Zincor refinery
6.5.9 Glen Douglas dolomite mine
6.6 Summary
7 Analysis of findings
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Analysis of Kumba Resources
7.2.1 Kumba Resources organisation level analysis
7.2.2 World-class performance in Kumba Resources
7.2.3 Role of knowledge management in the Kumba Resources business strategy
7.2.4 Importance of knowledge sharing in Kumba Resources
7.3 Analysis of Kumba Resources knowledge management function
7.3.1 Objectives and activities
7.3.2 World-class performance in Kumba Resources knowledge management function
7.4 Analysis of the Kumba Resources CICOP
7.4.1 Objectives and activities
7.4.2 World-class performance in Kumba Resources CICOP
7.4.3 Maturity of knowledge sharing in Kumba Resources CICOP
7.5 Analysis of the use of stories and storytelling in the CICOP
7.5.1 Overview of the use of stories and storytelling in CICOP
7.5.2 Ownership of stories and storytelling
7.5.3 Executive sponsorship of the use of stories and storytelling
7.5.4 Objectives for stories and storytelling
7.5.5 Funding of stories and storytelling
7.5.6 Tools for stories and storytelling
7.5.7 Training and education for stories and storytelling
7.5.8 Measures of stories and storytelling
7.5.9 Success stories of the use of stories and storytelling
7.5.10 Benchmarking internally or externally
7.5.11 Reward and recognition for use of stories and storytelling
7.5.12 Stories and storytelling model
7.5.13 Capture and reuse of stories
7.5.14 Catalogue of stories maintained
7.5.15 Use of stories and storytelling internally and externally
7.5.16 Role of technology in stories and storytelling
7.5.17 Understanding of where not to use stories and storytelling
7.5.18 Stories and storytelling community of practice
7.5.19 Stories and storytelling value rating scale
7.5.20 Summary of the use of stories and storytelling in CICOP
7.6 Summary
8 Conclusions and recommendations
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Answering the research problem
8.2.1 Main research problem
8.2.2 Research sub-problem 1
8.2.3 Research sub-problem 2
8.2.4 Research sub-problem 3
8.2.5 Research sub-problem 4
8.2.6 Research sub-problem 5
8.2.7 Answering the overall research problem
8.3 Recommendations
8.3.1 Ownership of stories and storytelling
8.3.2 Executive sponsorship of the use of stories and storytelling
8.3.3 Objectives for stories and storytelling
8.3.4 Funding of stories and storytelling
8.3.5 Tools to be used for stories and storytelling
8.3.6 Training and education for stories and storytelling
8.3.7 Measures of stories and storytelling
8.3.8 Success stories of stories and storytelling
8.3.9 Benchmarking internally or externally
8.3.10 Reward and recognition for use of stories and storytelling
8.3.11 Storytelling model
8.3.12 Capture and reuse of stories
8.3.13 Catalogue of stories maintained
8.3.14 Use of stories and storytelling internally and externally
8.3.15 Role of technology in stories and storytelling
8.3.16 Understanding of where not to use stories and storytelling
8.3.17 Stories and storytelling community of practice
8.3.18 Stories and storytelling value rating scale
8.3.19 Summary of recommendations
8.4 Recommendations for further research
8.4.1 World-class performance framework
8.4.2 Expansion of the research base
8.5 Summary
9 Bibliography

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