DYNAMICS OF THE FAMILY SOCIAL STRATA AND THE BOOK OF PROVERBS 

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CHAPTER THREE PORTRAITS OF HOME BASED NURTURING IN THE BOOK OF PROVERBS

The primacy of the home as the centre for instruction

In this chapter we are primarily interested in how the various texts project the home as the centre of instruction. In the previous chapter we considered the dynamics of the family social strata with specific reference to the Israelite and Shona cultures as guided by Gerstenberger (2002). We also introduced the book of Proverbs which is our main exegetical text that we now turn more attention to. Before we engage ourselves in a close analysis of these texts we would like to run a preliminary analysis of how the
home is particularised in the first nine chapters of the book of Proverbs. This will be followed by a brief description of the material and selection criterion of texts to be analysed closely.

Particularisation of the Home in Proverbs 1-9

We are principally interested in the situation within the home setting of the instructional exchanges that take place in the first nine chapters of the book of Proverbs. These will remain in the foreground of our exegetical analysis of selected texts within the first nine chapters of the book of Proverbs.

 Specific indications to the Home in Proverbs 1-9

Firstly, we have the general indication of an orientation towards the young in 1:4; cf.4:3; which is maintained throughout the first nine chapters of the book of Proverbs. At various points in our texts, particular nouns are employed that retain the juvenile point
of reference. The simple, the mockers and the foolish (1:4, 22, 32; 7:7; 8:5; 9:4, 16)represent the different levels of gullibility emblematic of the primal audience. We will explore further the precise meanings of these various groups, but at this juncture it is
sufficient to say that they seem to be young. Secondly and closely related to the above, we have the specification of “my son” in 1:8
which not only indicates the commencement of a new address in the majority of occurrences, but also intimates the father-son relationship it represents. In the first nine chapters, this vocative occurs some seventeen times and is a subject of concern in
another twenty-seven instances in the rest of the book of Proverbs. Dell (2006:51ff) argues in her account for the family as the social setting for chapters 10-22 of the book of Proverbs. She certainly makes inference to that effect for the first nine chapters as well (see Dell 2006: 1-50). Moss makes a more comprehensive statement pertaining to the home setting when he writes:
In Pr. 1-9 a wise parent gives numerous instructions in the second person address to a ‘son’ or ‘sons’, and the parent refers to his or her teaching as wisdom (2:2; 3:13; 4:5-9; 5:1;7:4). On this account the aim of Pr. 1-9 seems to locate wisdom within the Israelite household. When the household is understood to be the setting of the instructions, and the parents as the teachers, then the poems featuring personified speaking Wisdom (1:20-22; 8:1-26; 9:1-6) reinforce the teachings the parents give. Thirdly, we see the appearance of both parents in 1:8 (cf. 4:3; 6:20) and elsewhere as
involved in the instructional exercise that we have in the first nine chapters. It is noteworthy to have this appearance in the very first address as it carries implications through the rest of the account. Outside of the first nine chapters, the father/mother parallel occurs few times (Pr. 10:1; 15:20; 19:26; 20:20; 23:22, 25; 28:24; 30:7).
Pezhumkattil (1994:69) alleges that the “relationship between man and woman, especially between husband and wife is presented in the wisdom books to give moral and ethical discipline to people with a view to create harmony and fear of God in families and in society”. We can therefore appreciate the appearance of both parents in this exercise as they play a key role. We think it is the precise mentioning of both parents here that demands consideration of the home setting at face value. There is also something to be said about the importance of family instructions in the post exilic era in which it is perceived that the material in Proverbs 1-9 was written (see Bland1998:222).

List of Figures and Tables
Acknowledgements 
Abstract 
Abbreviations
CHAPTER ONE: PRELIMINARY ISSUES 
1. Purpose of study 
2 Projected focus of the study and chapter divisions 
3 Proposed methodological approach 
4. Causes attributed to the fragmentation of the Zimbabwean society 
4.1 The constraints of urbanisation
4.2 The challenge of the HIV/AIDS pandemic
4.3 The current economical hardships
4.4 The concerns raised in our educational standards
4.5 The collapse of the family
CHAPTER TWO: DYNAMICS OF THE FAMILY SOCIAL STRATA AND THE BOOK OF PROVERBS 
1. Defining the family 
1.1 A Description of the Israelite family setup
1.1.1 Israelite family setup
1.1.2 Scope of faith within the Israelite family
1.1.3 Israelite family ethics
1.2 A Description of the Shona family setup 
1.2.1 The Shona family setup
1.2.2 The Shona family/clan ethics
2. Introduction to the book of Proverbs
2.1 The setting of the book of Proverbs
2.2 The subject matter of the book of Proverbs
2.3 Structure of the book of Proverbs
2.4 The sacredness of the book of Proverbs
2.5 The family in the book of Proverbs
CHAPTER THREE: PORTRAITS OF HOME BASED NURTURING IN THE BOOK OF PROVERBS 
1. The primacy of the home as the centre for nurturing 
1.1 Particularisation of the Home in Proverbs 1-9
1.1.1 Specific indications to the home in Proverbs 1-9
1.1.2 Allusions to the Home in Proverbs 1-9
1.1.3 Criterion for text selection in Proverbs 1-9
2. Exegetical approach 
2.1 The Prologue 1:1-7
2.1.1 The Text
2.1.2 Translation
2.1.3 Commentary
2.1.4 Patron of the book 1:1
2.1.5 Purpose of the book 1:2-6
2.1.6 Principle of the book 1:7
3. Parental appeal against wicked company 1:8-19
3.1 The text and exegetical framework
3.1.1 Translation
3.1.2 The address 1:8-9
3.1.3 The prohibition 1:10-14
3.1.4 The rationale 1:15-18
3.1.5 The consequence 1:19
3.1.6 Reflection on the parental appeal
4. Passion for God as the Quest for wisdom 3:1-12 
4.1 Text and exegetical framework
4.1.1 Translation
4.1.2 Inner texture in Proverbs 3:1-12
4.1.3 Intertexture in Proverbs 3:1-12
4.1.4 Social and cultural texture in Proverbs 3:1-12
4.1.5 Sacred texture in Proverbs 3:1-12
4.1.6 Reflection on Proverbs 3:1-12
5. Instructions on being neighbourly 3:27-35 
5.1. Text and exegetical framework
5.1.1 Translation
5.1.2 Inner texture in Proverbs 3:27-35
5.1.3 Intertexture in Proverbs 3:27-35
5.1.4 Social and cultural texture in 3:27-35
5.1.5 Sacred texture in Proverbs 3:27-35
5.1.6 Reflecting on Proverbs 3:27-35
6. Release from unnecessary indebtedness 6:1-5 
6.1 Text and exegetical framework
6.1.1 Translation
6.1.2 Inner texture in Proverbs 6:1-5
6.1.3 Intertexture in Proverbs 6:1-5
6.1.4 Social and cultural texture in Proverbs 6:1-5
6.1.5 Reflection on Proverbs 6:1-5
CHAPTER FOUR: WISDOM AND THE PRIMACY OF HOME BASED NURTURING 
1. Instructions on the quest for wisdom 
1.1 Protection realised through wisdom 2:1-22
1.1.1 Text and exegetical framework
1.1.2 Translation
1.1.3 The Address 2:1a
1.1.4 The Protasis 2:1b-4
1.1.5 The Apodosis 2:5-11
1.1.6 Protection from wicked men 2:12-15
1.1.7 Protection from the wayward woman 2:16-19
1.1.8 The outcome 2:20-22
1.1.9 Reflecting on the protection realised through wisdom
1.2 Wise advice for the sluggard 6:6-11 
1.2.1 Text and exegetical framework
1.2.2 Translation
1.2.3 Inner texture in Proverbs 6:6-11
1.2.4 Intertexture in Proverbs 6:6-11
1.2.5 Social and cultural texture in Proverbs 6:6-11
1.2.6 Reflecting on Proverbs 6:6-11
1.3 Against the malevolent character 6:12-15 
1.3.1 Text and exegetical framework
1.3.2 Translation
1.3.3 Inner texture in Proverbs 6:12-15
1.3.4 Intertexture in Proverbs 6:12-15
1.3.5 Social and cultural texture in 6:12-15
1.3.6 Reflecting on Proverbs 6:12-15
1.4 Abominable conduct in Proverbs 6:16-19 
1.4.1 Text and exegetical framework
1.4.2 Translation
1.4.3 Inner texture in Proverbs 6:16-19
1.4.4 Intertexture in Proverbs 6:16-19
1.4.5 Social and cultural texture in Proverbs 6:16-19
1.4.6 Sacred texture in Proverbs 6:16-19
1.4.7 Reflecting on Proverbs 6:16-19
1.5 Personification of wisdom 1:20-33 
1.5.1 The text and exegetical framework
1.5.2. Translation
1.5.3 Inner Texture of Wisdom’s poem
1.5.4 Intertexture of Wisdom’s poem
1.5.5 Social and Cultural texture of Wisdom’s poem
1.5.6 Ideological texture of Wisdom’s poem
1.5.7 Sacred texture of Wisdom’s poem
1.5.8 Reflection on the role of Wisdom’s poem
1.6 Invitations by Woman Wisdom and Woman Folly 9:1-18
1.6.1 Text and exegetical framework
1.6.2 Translation
1.6.3 Invitation to Woman Wisdom’s feast
1.6.4 Invitational interlude 9:7-12
1.6.5 Invitation of Woman Folly’s feast 9:13-18
1.6.6 Reflecting on Proverbs 9:1-18
CHAPTER FIVE: HOME BASED NURTURING IN THE LIGHT OF SHONA WISDOM POEMS 
1. Shona perspectives of home based nurturing 
1.1 Description of Wisdom Poem and its function
1.1.1 Nature of Shona wisdom poems
1.1.2 An analysis of Shona wisdom poems
1.1.2.1 An opening poem
1.1.2.2 An extract from “Childbirth and rearing”
2 Dialogue between biblical and Shona Wisdom poems
2.1 Using the Shona context to interpret the book of Proverbs 1-9
2.2 Implications for the study of the Old Testament
2.3 Recreating the instructional environment
2.4 Reading the book of Proverbs today
CHAPTER SIX: REFLECTION ON HOME BASED NURTURING AS A CONTEMPORARY IDEAL AND CONCLUSIONS
1. Realising the compelling task of home based nurturing 
1.1 Revisiting the issues
2 Summation of Exegetical findings 
2.1 Objectives of the instructional premise
2.2 Adopted exegetical strategies
3 Recommendations 
4 Conclusion 
Bibliography 

READ  The search for a new feminine ideal in the 1960’s, from the newly emancipated American woman to the feminist 

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THE CONTEMPORARY SIGNIFICANCE OF HOME BASED NURTURING WITH REFERENCE TO WISDOM POEMS IN THE BOOK OF PROVERBS AND SHONA TRADITIONAL CULTURE

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