GROUNDED THEORY: GENERATING CATEGORIES AND CODING THE DATA

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Semi-structured interviews

The semi-structured interviews were piloted with Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of companies who had extensive national and international experience in the security service. Some of these CEOs are managing a chain of security companies in Gauteng. The pilot study helped to understand some of the practical aspects of establishing access, making contact and conducting the interviews, as well as becoming alert to one’s own interviewing skills (Greef, 2007b: 294).
Twelve senior managers from the Security Service in Gauteng were identified by their CEOs for semi-structured interviews. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with the senior managers using an interview guide to direct the interview. Questions for the interview guide were derived from the research questions and literature study. The questions consisted of main questions, probing questions and follow up questions relevant to the research questions. The interview was focussed and discursive. It allowed the researcher and the participants to explore the collection and analysis of security information and the application of security risk control measures (Greef, 2007b: 293).
The semi-structured interviews assisted the researcher to obtain an understanding of the existing practices being used by security service providers in Gauteng. The interviewer had the advantage of building empathy between himself and the interviewee, resulting in greater involvement and better quality data (Robson, 2000: 90). Even if this did not occur, the interviewer was in a position to assess the degree of the interviewee’s interest and involvement. Data obtained under these circumstances could be more easily compared, with less risk of bias occurring, as different people are asked the same questions.
Semi–structured, one-on-one interviews were used to gain a detailed picture of the nature and extent of problems being experienced in the collection and analysis of security information and the implementation of security risk control measures. Interview guide used for the semi-structured interviews is attached (See Appendix 1). Consent forms were also completed by both the interviewee and the researcher, to conduct the semi structured interviews with the necessary confidentiality (See Appendix 2.
Purposive interviews were also carried out with the SAPS, other stakeholders from the security service environment and academia to determine individual perceptions, opinions, facts, forecasts and their reactions to initial findings and potential solutions (Greef, 2007a: 202). The purpose was to understand the experience of security managers and other stakeholders in the collection and analysis of security information and the implementation of security risk control measures (Greef, 2007b: 293). Letter requesting permission from SAPS together with approval letter are attached (See Appendices 3 and 4).

Focus group interviews

Focus groups were used to evaluate the collection and analysis of security information and the implementation of security risk control measures in the security service. Participants were selected from among security officers registered with PSIRA and employed by security service providers in Gauteng. The researcher decided to hold focus group discussions at a neutral setting. It is believed that this type of setting would motivate respondent participation. The focus group discussions were held at the UNISA campus in Pretoria, Gauteng.
The focus group discussion was facilitated by the researcher, with the assistance of a scribe who took notes. The focus group discussion started by the researcher introducing himself as the facilitator. The scribe was introduced to the participants. The facilitator outlined the purpose of the focus group discussion. All participants introduced themselves and mentioned the security service provider they work for in Gauteng. Participants were informed that if they felt uncomfortable or felt the questions were becoming too sensitive, they could exit the focus group discussion at any time.
The researcher used questions, consisting of main questions, probing questions and follow-up questions relevant to the research questions (Greef, 2007b: 293). The questions posed to the participants were in everyday, non-professional language to generate rich descriptions and authentic data. The focus group discussions were also audio-taped for future reference. Throughout this process the researcher’s essential motivation was a desire to listen and learn from the participants. It helped the researcher to explore the collection and analysis of security information and the application of security risk control measures. It also helped uncover new facts and to understand the practices within the security environment. The researcher also understood how security officials interpreted security information management concepts in practice. There was an atmosphere of trust and openness. Participants shared their experiences voluntarily.
Focus group responses were used as a supplementary source of data to the semi-structured interviews conducted with an interview guide (Morgan, 1997: 2). This method of collective interviewing with security officers from Gauteng was used to validate the semi-structured interviews.

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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION FOR THE RESEARCH
1.1 INTRODUCTION.
1.2 RATIONALE FOR THE STUDY.
1.3 PROBLEM STATEMENT
1.4 RESEARCH QUESTIONS
1.5 RESEARCH GOAL
1.6 DEFINITIONS
1.7 OUTLINE OF THE THESIS
1.8 CONCLUSIO
CHAPTER 2: METHODOLOGICAL EXPOSITION OF THE RESEARCH DESIGN
2.1 INTRODUCTION
2.2 METHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK
2.3 CONCLUSION
CHAPTER 3: GROUNDED THEORY: GENERATING CATEGORIES AND CODING THE DATA
3.1 INTRODUCTION
3.2 CONCEPTUAL CONSTRUCTION AND CATEGORISATION OF DATA: A THEMATIC EXPOSITION
3.3 SCHEMATIC PROPOSAL OF THE GROUNDED THEORY
CHAPTER 4: SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
4.1 INTRODUCTION
4.2 SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT CULTURE
4.3 COLLECTION OF SECURITY INFORMATION
4.4 ANALYSIS OF SECURITY INFORMATION
4.5 IMPLEMENTATION OF SECURITY RISK CONTROL MEASURES
4.6 CONCLUSION.
CHAPTER 5: CASE STUDIES ON SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
CHAPTER 6: DATA ANALYSIS OF QUESTIONNAIRES
CHAPTER 7: SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT MODEL:
CHAPTER 8: FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

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MANAGEMENT OF SECURITY INFORMATION IN THE SECURITY INDUSTRY

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