THE BAPTIST CONVENTION OF SOUTH AFRICA

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THE CONSTITUTIONOF THE BANTUBAPTISTCHURCH

The work of the Baptist Convention had grown to the point where it became necessary that it be constituted as a unit. Preparatory stages of such a move were indirectly underway. The native leaders (deacons and preachers) quarterly meeting reported about in 1904, and the inauguration of Ibunga lamabandla amaBaptist, (Council for Baptist Churches) by natives during the occasion of the Easter weekend in Kaffraria in 1915, comprising Kaffraria and Transkei (1904 and 1915 SABMS reports in Mogashoa, 2000:44) were a shadow of the reality that was to materialize in 1927. By implication, native leaders were already prepared to run their own work, albeit with the need for more and better training.
By 1926 the Northern and Southern Native Councils were operating in full swing, meeting occasionally to discuss matters of common interest and fellowship. The missionary report states, « The success and usefulness of the Northern and Southern Native Councils has led to the decision to form an Eastern one for E. Pondoland, E. Griqualand and Alfred County, and Durban as distances have prevented their representatives from attending in Kafjraria or Transkei » (TSABHB, 1926-27:16). What is being argued here is not so much the formation of another council as to the vibrancy, success, and usefulness of native councils. The stage was now ready for the formation of one body of all Convention churches.
The formation of the Baptist Convention (as it is known presently) was precipitated further by the meeting of four missionary superintendents of the Baptist Union in June of 1926. It was during the occasion of this meeting that a recommendation was made to the end that « …the name of our Native churches be ‘The Bantu Baptist Church of the ‘S.A.B.MS. « . It was further indicated that the name would « …be most acceptable to the Natives and will be a help in the work. » (ibid, 16). Minutes of the 1926 missionary sessions (September, 20) add to say that coming up with the new name was also in response to the request of native leaders (ibid, 33).

LEVELLING THE GROUND
1.1 Introduction.
1.2The research.
1.2.1 The field of research
1.2.2 How I arrived at this theme.
1.2.3 The erection of borders.
1.2.4 The purpose of the research.
1.2.5 The relevance of the research.
1.3 How this research fits into Practical Theology.
1.3.1 Understanding practical theology.
1.3.2 How Christian education fits into practical theology.
1.4 Formulation of the problem.
1.4.1 The problem as argued by other Christian educators and authors.
1.4.2 The manifestation of problematic areas in
Convention churches.
The framework of the thesis.
2 METHODOLOGY
2.1 Background.
2.2 Methodology.
2.2.1 The nature of the research.
2.2.2 Interviews.
2.2.3 Baptist Union hand-books.
2.2.4 Secondary sources.
2.2.5 The model adopted for the research.
2.3 Literature review.
2.3.1 Introduction.
2.3.2 The South African Baptist Hand-books.
2.3.3 Published books.
2.3.4 Journal articles.
2.3.5 Theses and dissertations.
2.4 Conclusion.
3. THE BAPTIST CONVENTION OF SOUTH AFRICA: A HISTORICAL OVERVIEW 
3.1 Introduction.
3.2 The role of native workers and missionaries in the founding, Growth, and spread of the Baptist Convention of South Africa from 1869 to 1927.
3.2.1 The role of native workers in the founding and growth of the Baptist Convention of South Africa.
3.2.2 Missionary involvement in the origin, growth and spread of the Baptist Convention of South Africa.
3.3 Early beginnings.
3.4 The constitution of the Bantu Baptist Church.
3.4.1 Preparatory stages.
3.4.2 The Bantu Baptist Church.
3.5 From 1927 onwards.
3.5.1 Continued growt
3.5.2 The training of native workers for ministry.
3.5.3 Statistical returns for 1979.
3.5.4 Baptist Convention church polity.
The Baptist Convention and the Baptist Union part company.
3.6.1 The ‘merger’ talks.
3.7 The Transvaal churches of the Baptist Convention of South Africa
4. THE MEANING AND PURPOSE OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION
4.1 Introduction.
4.2 The Meaning of Education.
4.3 The Meaning of Christian Education
4.4 Other Designations for Christian Education
4.5 Contending for Christian Education.
4.6 The Purpose of Christian Education.
4.7 Conclusion.
5. THE HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 
5.1 Introduction.
5.2 The historical development of Religious education in the Old Testament.
5.3 The historical development of Christian education in the New Testament.
5.4 The historical development of Christian education during the Reformation.
5.5 The rise of the Baptist Movement.
5.6 Conclusion.
6. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN THE TRANSVAAL BAPTIST CONVENTION CHURCHES 
7. THE EVALUA TION OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN THE BAPTIST CONVENTION OF SOUTH AFRICA 
8. STRATEGIES FOR EFFECTIVE CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN FUTURE

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