THE CONCEPTS OF KNOWLEDGE, MANAGEMENT AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

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Introduction

The implementation of Information Technology (IT) has had a significant impact on the way in which an organisation functions and how it relates to an organisation‘s need for knowledge (Fink & Ploder, 2007, 2009). It has had a clear impact on how organisations manage, store, share, retrieve, distribute, collect and redistribute resources between individuals (Hodgkinson & Healey, 2008 and Laio et al., 2008). Subsequently, IT has had an influence on the way in which a business or organisation evolved and how organisational knowledge needs have subsequently evolved. The organisational evolution brought about by IT has had a direct impact on the way in which knowledge and skills flow in and out of the organisation, based on the changing nature of the organisation (Lytras & Pouloudi, 2006; Fink & Ploder, 2007, 2009). These evolutionary changes not only influenced organisational functioning and the knowledge found in and required by the organisation, it also influenced the skills related to the organisation as a complexity amplifier. Authors such as Hodgkinson and Healey (2008) indicate that technology influences knowledge and behaviour, thereby influencing the way in which individuals experience practical day-to-day working scenarios. The implementation and application of IT impacts business processes and conversely the need for knowledge and IT resources (Nurcan, 2008, ter Hofstede et al., 2009; van der Aalst et al., 2011).
Critical in this IT evolution, the retention of knowledge became of significant importance to the organisation. Knowledge systematically ‗walked out of the door‘ when an individual left theorganisation for various reasons. This in itself created a dilemma for the organisation as knowledge was lost. Systematically, influenced by this evolution of the organisation, knowledge became recognised as a critical resource for organisational competitiveness, innovation and success (Kanawattanachai & Yoo, 2007). For example, Kanawattanachai and Yoo (2007: 783) state that ‗an organi[s]ation’s ability to create and share knowledge is important for establishing and sustaining competitive advantage‘. Also, for example, Laio et al. (2008) indicate that the appropriate application of knowledge could enhance an organisation. This is supported by Holsapple‘s statement that ‗[c]omputer-based technology has transformed the way in which individuals and organisations accomplish knowledge work by amplifying, complementing, leveraging, and (in some cases) improving on innate human knowledge handling capabilities‘ (Holsapple, 2005: 47).
Additionally, Laio et al. (2008) indicate that the growth in knowledge in an organisation through learning, innovation, and importation or outsourcing of tasks (to make use of other knowledge), has the potential to improve innovation in an organisation. One can deduce from Kanawattanachai and Yoo (2007) together with Laio et al. (2008) that knowledge has the potential of improving an organisation‘s productivity and competitiveness.

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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO ORGANISATIONAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT NEEDS
1.1.Introduction.
1.2. Brief Background to Knowledge Management Concerns
1.3. Research Problem and Objectives
1.4. Demarcating the Study of Knowledge Management.
1.5. Methodological Approach.
1.6. Division of Sectional Building-Blocks.
CHAPTER 2: THE CONCEPTS OF KNOWLEDGE, MANAGEMENT AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
2.1. Introduction
2.1.1. Aim.
2.1.2. Scope.
2.2. Data, Information and Knowledge and the Interaction thereo
2.2.1. Data ..
2.2.2. Information.
2.2.3. Knowledge
2.3. Knowledge as a Human Construct
2.4. Management as a Knowledge Concept .
2.5Summary
CHAPTER 3: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT DEFINED 
3.1. Introduction
3.1.1. Aim.
3.1.2. Scope.
3.2. Knowledge Management as Described in Literature
3.3. Knowledge Management as Defined in Literature
CHAPTER 4: ORGANISATIONAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
4.1. Introduction.
4.1.1. Aim.
4.1.2. Scope.
4.2. The Nature of the ‘Organisation’ .
4.2.1. The Structure of an ‗Organisation‘
4.3. Need for Organisational Knowledge Management
CHAPTER 5: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND APPROACH.
CHAPTER 6: STUDY OF THE FUNDAMENTAL BUILDING BLOCKS OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT THAT SATISFY ORGANISATIONAL NEEDS
CHAPTER 7: RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS

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