Competences and professional characteristics expected of reflective neonatal nurses

Get Complete Project Material File(s) Now! »

Transferability

Transferability or applicability is the degree to which the findings can be applied to another context or setting or can be generalised (Babbie & Mouton 2001:277; Krefting 1991:220-221; Lincoln & Guba 1985:316; Rossouw 2003:182-183). Ensuring transferability was not the main aim of the study, but rather an unlooked-for consequence of the thick description yielded by the research process and the validation of the results. The experts who evaluated the model were given an opportunity to evaluate the model for transferability as part of their evaluation (see Chapter 8).

Dependability

Dependability is the extent to which evidence is provided to the audience that if the study were to be repeated with the same or similar respondents in the same or similar context, the findings would be similar (Babbie & Mouton 2001:278; Krefting 1991:221; Lincoln & Guba 1985:316-318; Rossouw 2003:183). Due to the dynamic nature of the context of this study, a repetition would not necessarily obtain the same results. The detailed description or audit trail of the methodology offered in this report though enhances the ability of the audience to judge the trustworthiness of the findings.

Confirmability

Confirmability or neutrality is the degree to which the findings are without bias or influence (Babbie & Mouton 2001:278; Krefting 1991:216,221; Lincoln & Guba 1985:318-327). It is enhanced in this study by triangulation, peer reviews and the description of a confirmable audit route and process.

ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS

Ethical decisions in this study were made, based on guidelines described by Crookes and Davies (1998:207-222), Streubert and Carpenter (1999:107) and Strydom (2002b:64-74). The aim of the study was to develop a model for the education of reflective neonatal nurses in a South African context. It did not involve any clinical trial or direct patient involvement and the study did not investigate a sensitive topic. No known harm or adverse effects were expected for any participants. The study intended to contribute to nursing science as a profession, nursing education, neonatal nursing science, neonatal nursing practice and higher education.
All principles of privacy, anonymity and confidentiality were adhered to throughout the study. The input obtained from the participants could not be linked back to them, even though the phenomenon under investigation was not a sensitive issue. No names were written down at any stage of the study. All sources are acknowledged as accurately and completely as possible.
The researcher was competent and adequately skilled to undertake the study, and throughout adhered to the requirements of the University of Pretoria in terms of qualifications, research knowledge, supervision, approval from the Ethics Committee of the University of Pretoria prior to the study, approval from the Postgraduate Committee of the School of Health Care Sciences and approval from the Academic Advisory Committee of the School of Health Care Sciences of the University of Pretoria.

HIGHER EDUCATION IN SOUTH AFRICA APPLICABLE TO NEONATAL NURSING EDUCATION

Nursing education, being part of the main stream of higher education in the South African context, has to comply with higher education requirements. Changes in higher education systems, especially in the last decade, have contributed significantly to the development of nursing education. Particularly important developments in higher education were the promulgation of the Higher Education Act, no. 101 of 1997 (South Africa 1997) and the South African Qualifications Authority Act, no. 58 of 1995 (South Africa 1995); the adoption of outcome-based education as the basic philosophy of education in South Africa at all levels (South Africa 1995); and the publication of the National Qualifications Framework (Ministry of Education 2006). Each of these will be briefly discussed.

READ  SERVQUAL – How to measure service quality

Aim of education

The aim of education according to SAQA is lifelong learning, and the underlying philosophy of the prescribed NQF is outcomes-based education (OBE). SAQA stipulates that “the learning outcomes of all South African qualifications should include critical cross-field or generic skills to promote lifelong learning as well as discipline, domain-specific or specialised knowledge, skills and reflexivity” (Ministry of Education 2004:7).
The concept of ‘lifelong learning’ is used synonymously with ‘autonomy of learning’ and refers to the extent to which a learner can undertake action for learning independently, takes responsibility for his/her own learning and is self-reflexive about and can evaluate the quality of his/her learning and eventually that of others (Council on Higher Education 2002:49). The education of reflective neonatal nurses conforms with this aim, since lifelong learning is a characteristic of a reflective practitioner (Hillier 2002:22-25; Rolfe 2000:90-92; Van Aswegen et al. 2000:128-134); neonatal nursing is domain-specific and implies specialised knowledge and skills (Carter 1998:xix-xx; SANC 1993d & e; SANC 2000:1-2); and reflexivity is a cornerstone of reflective practice (Atkins & Murphy 1993:1189; Greenwood et al. 2000:1106; Pappas & Walker 2004:116; Rolfe 2000:155-163; Van Aswegen et al. 2000:126).

Chapter 1: Orientation of the study
1.1 INTRODUCTION
1.2 BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY
1.3 PROBLEM STATEMENT AND RESEARCH QUESTION
1.4 RESEARCH METHODS
1.5 FRAME OF REFERENCE
1.6 OUTLINE OF THE STUDY
1.7 SUMMARY
Chapter 2: Research methodology
2.1 INTRODUCTION
2.2 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
2.3 STRATEGIES FOR TRUSTWORTHINESS OF THIS STUDY
2.4 SUMMARY
Chapter 3: Framework of neonatal nursing education in the South African context
3.1 INTRODUCTION
3.2 HIGHER EDUCATION IN SOUTH AFRICA APPLICABLE TO NEONATAL NURSING EDUCATION
3.3 HEALTH IN SOUTH AFRICA
3.4 NURSING EDUCATION
3.5 FRAMEWORK FOR EDUCATING REFLECTIVE NEONATAL NURSES
3.6 SUMMARY
Chapter 4: Neonatal nursing students and reflective learning
4.1 INTRODUCTION
4.2 NEONATAL NURSES AS STUDENTS
4.3 PROCESS OF REFLECTIVE LEARNING
4.4 APPLIED COMPETENCES AND REFLECTIVE LEARNING
4.5 PROFESSIONAL CHARACTERISTICS AND REFLECTIVE LEARNING
4.6 OUTCOMES OF REFLECTIVE LEARNING
4.7 SUMMARY
Chapter 5: Competences and professional characteristics expected of reflective neonatal nurses
5.1 INTRODUCTION
5.2 ATTRIBUTES AND DEMANDS OF NEONATAL NURSING PRACTICE AND COMPETENCES EXPECTED OF REFLECTIVE NEONATAL NURSES
5.3 PROFESSIONAL CHARACTERISTICS DEMANDED BY NEONATAL NURSING PRACTICE
5.4 CONTENT OUTLINE AND EXPECTED OUTCOMES OF PROGRAMME FOR EDUCATION OF REFLECTIVE NEONATAL NURSES
5.5 SUMMARY
Chapter 6: Approaches to educating reflective neonatal nurses
6.1 INTRODUCTION
6.2 TEACHING REFLECTIVE NEONATAL NURSES
6.3 ROLE OF THE EDUCATOR IN REFLECTIVE EDUCATION
6.4 EDUCATIONAL APPROACHES
6.5 SUITABLE APPROACHES FOR EDUCATING REFLECTIVE NEONATAL NURSES
6.6 SUMMARY
Chapter 7: Development and description of the model
7.1 INTRODUCTION
7.2 METHODOLOGY OF MODEL DEVELOPMENT
7.3 DESCRIPTION OF THE MODEL
7.4 SUMMARY
Chapter 8: Evaluation of model, limitations, conclusions and recommendations
8.1 INTRODUCTION
8.2 EVALUATION OF THE MODEL
8.3 CONCLUSIONS
8.4 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
8.5 RECOMMENDATIONS
8.6 SUMMARY
References

GET THE COMPLETE PROJECT

Related Posts