HEORETICAL BACKGROUND TO SOCIAL MARKETING

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Where Road Safety Education begins

Road Safety Education in SA is started at the lowest level possible, which is pre-school age, and is continued through the schooling phases in a continually expanding and developing nature, from the ordinary safe crossing of a street to the driving of a vehicle carrying passengers. Much time, effort and money was ploughed into this approach though the development of the Curriculum 2005 material, with specific emphasis on the Outcomes Based Education (OBE) principles of the new system of education. Presently the OBE is being discarded, but parts of the Life Skills learning could look into critical areas like Road Safety. According to the Strategy 2000 document released by the National Department of Transport in May, both short and medium term goals were put down. It will take many years before the fruits of these labours can be seen, but even this will not be worth much if the broad mass of road users do not care or involve them in the active task of making our roads safer.

How can the educational experiences gained at early learning stages of children be held in good stead later in life?

Continual exposure is one method, through the use of media campaigns, target oriented advertisements, community involvement, advanced training schemes, whilst another method is visible and protracted law enforcement, through the use of safety belts, tough measures against reckless driving, drinking and driving, and others. Another highly successful method of ensuring continued educational awareness is the point system for driving licences linked to the retesting of these licences after five years.
Education in any sphere is based largely on a cause and effect relationship. A house is built in a certain way, or sequence of steps, and not in another way otherwise it will fall apart and walls will crack. Road Safety Education is built along the same principles. Street should be crossed in a certain manner; otherwise the pedestrian may be seriously injured or killed. One does not overtake on a blind rise because of the danger to yourself and other road users. Road Traffic Law enforcement should be implemented to re-enforce this concept. Failure to adhere to basic laws governing road usage will mean trouble, whether with the law, or through accident and death, financial loss or compulsory re-training and education. Education is long term whilst immediate consciousness of the correct type of action in people minds as well as the correct attitudes, are not. Education should be stimulated and re-enforced, especially, when the opportunity for formal education is no longer possible.

Community participation in Road Safety

The term community in the context of health and welfare policy usually refers to marginalised people whose need for access to health and welfare services are to be addressed. However, these people should not be viewed as passive recipients, but should be involved as active stakeholders. Most of the above-mentioned changes include intergovernmental or inter-sectoral co-operation.
Participation in service delivery should include all aspects, from planning and decisionmaking to the management of the implementation, and should eventually lead to the empowerment of the community representatives on the stakeholder structure. Some examples are found in health committees, policing forums, and council committees. Practical aspects of participation: Communities have been contributing to health and welfare through the ages, as in the care for the disabled or elderly or in home-based care for the terminally ill.

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CHAPTER 1 ORIENTATION AND INTRODUCTION 
1.1 Problem statement
1.2 Assumptions of the study
1.3 Aims of the study
1.4 Key research questions
1.5 Background to the study
1.6 Objectives of the study
1.7 Purpose of the study
1.8 A literature review
1.9 Research Methodology
1.10 Delimitations of the study
1.11 Assessment Exercise by focus group
1.12 Thesis outline
CHAPTER 2
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Persuasion
2.3 Chapter Summary
CHAPTER 3 HEORETICAL BACKGROUND TO SOCIAL MARKETING
3.1 Orientation
3.2 Definition of social marketing
3.3 The history and nature of Social Campaigns
3.4 Characteristics of Social Marketing
3.5 The Social Marketing process
3.6 Marketing to promote Road Safety
3.7 Overcoming objections to Social Marketing
3.8 Social Marketing does not replace
3.9 Application areas
3.10 Challenges to Social Marketing
3.11 The Problem is Behaviour, not Marketing
3.12 Culture and Social Marketing
3.13 The Role of Communication and Social Marketing in Road Safety Behaviour
3.14 Problems encountered when dealing with messages about Road Safety Behaviour
3.15 Road Safety Communication media choices
3.16 General Communication Recommendations for the possible improvement of future Road Safety Programmes
3.17 Barriers to effective Social Marketing
3.18 Conclusion
CHAPTER 4 ROAD SAFETY PROMOTION STRATEGIES
4.1 Introduction
4.2. Is Road Safety a problem?
4.3. Road Design and Road Furniture
4.4 Routine Road Maintenance
4.5 Road traffic control, driver training and regulation of motorists
4.6 Road Safety Audits
4.7 North West Province specific Road Safety promotion Strategies
4.8. Promoting Road Safety promotion in South Africa: Selecting a Model
4.9 The need for a Social Marketing Model for Road Safety promotion in South Africa
4.10. Conclusion
CHAPTER 5 NATURE OF ROAD SAFETY PROMOTION
5.1 Introduction
5.2. Nature of Road Safety
5.3 Road Safety promotion in South Africa
5.4 Approaches to Road Safety promotion in the North West province
5.5 Other impacts
5.6. People’s right to Safety
5.7. Chapter Summary
CHAPTER 6 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Methodology, Research methods
6.3 Sampling
6.4 Methods and Instruments
6.5 Construction and Description of the Interview Schedule
6.6 Interview Procedures
6.7 Decoding of the data
6.8 Population and sample
6.9 Validity and Reliability of Data
6.10 Data Analysis and Interpretation
6.11 Chapter Summary
CHAPTER SEVEN FINDINGS, INTERPRETATION AND DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Procedures for the Focus Group Interviews conducted in the three provinces
7.3 Presentation of the Responses of the Focus Group Interviews
7.4 Summary of the Findings from the Focus Group Interviews
7.5 Chapter Summary
CHAPTER EIGHT CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Assessing the Research Questions
8.3 Results of the Research: Findings and Conclusions
8.4. Recommendations
8.5. Recommendations for Further Study
8.6 Summary and Conclusion
BIBLIOGRAPHY

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