REQUIREMENTS ON THE MATERIALS SUPPLY SYSTEM

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Production system development

Bellgran and Säfsten (2009) suggest a method for the development of a production system in which materials supply aspects are considered as one of the system factors. This method consists of five stages, each involving a number of different phases. The five stages are design process management, preparatory design, design specification, realization and planning and production ramp-up. The preparatory design stage consists of two phases, the background study and the pre-study, which lead up to the resulting requirements specification. The background study concerns analyzing existing systems, both the company‟s own and those of other companies, while the pre-study is about looking at the expected nature of the system to be designed. This means looking at forecast demand, growth potential, stakeholder requirements etc. The results from both the background study and the pre-study should then make up the requirements specification, which states the requirements of the system.

Product realization projects

Säfsten and Johansson (2004) states a definition of PRP as all tasks and activities necessary to develop solutions to an identified customer demand and to realize these solutions in form of physical products with related services.
Within this definition the MSS is one aspect to consider since it is the system that provides the production resources with material for its processes (Bellgran, 1998). Bellgran and Säfsten (2009) define product realization as the process between product planning and finished product. A PRP is about developing and producing products that are attractive for costumers. The concept of this PRP is wider than the concept of product development. According to Bellgran and Säfsten (2009) the product development should be integrated with production system development to reach an effective and efficient product realization process. A sequential flow of a product lifecycle is shown in figure 1 where the product realization is graphically defined.
The work on developing production systems needs to be improved (Bellgran and Säfsten, 2009). While the work on developing and improving product is open to constant development the progress of production system is inferior. Since most of the manufacturing companies are under constant press and global concurrence, there is potential of competitive advantages by developing and improving production systems (Bellgran and Säfsten, 2009).

Concurrent engineering

The traditional view on product and process development is a step-by step, sequential staged model. In addition, each stage is completed before the next one starts (Slack and Lewis, 2008). They mention that this method is easy to use and manage but is costly and time consuming.
During the last years, the shorter life-cycles of products have created more stress on the product realization time. Being on time to market with a product may be more important than keeping the budget for the development project. This means that the different steps in the development process must overlap (Olhager, 2000). This is a concept often referred to as CE.
Sohlenius (1992) states that simultaneous engineering or CE is used to increase the competitiveness by decreasing lead-times and simultaneously improves quality and cost. The methodology is to integrate the product development with the development of the production system.
Time and money may be saved by developing different parts of a project in parallel, which is common in many product development projects. The more parts of the project that may be developed simultaneously the better, but it may cause risk since the different parts may not match (Tonnquist, 2008).
Zhou et al (1996) argues that CE considers all factors of a product development process; design, analysis, manufacturing, testing, quality control and marketing in order to reduce the time to market and cost for the product and improving quality.

1 Introduction 
1.1 BACKGROUND
1.2 PURPOSE AND THESIS QUESTIONS
1.3 SCOPE
1.4 OUTLINE
2 Methodology 
2.1 LITERATURE
2.2 CASE STUDY
2.3 VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY
3 Theoretical framework
3.1 PRODUCTION SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT
3.2 PRODUCT REALIZATION PROJECTS
3.3 CONCURRENT ENGINEERING
3.4 REQUIREMENTS
3.5 MATERIALS SUPPLY SYSTEM DESIGN
3.6 STAKEHOLDERS
4 Analysis of theoretical framework
4.1 STAKEHOLDERS
4.2 REQUIREMENTS ON THE MATERIALS SUPPLY SYSTEM
5 Case description
5.1 STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS
5.2 CUSTOMER AND SUPPLIER REQUIREMENTS
5.3 MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS
5.4 EMPLOYEE REQUIREMENTS
5.5 OWNER REQUIREMENTS
5.6 CONCLUDING REMARKS .
6 Case analysis
6.1 STAKEHOLDERS
6.2 REQUIREMENTS STRUCTURE
7 Requirement specification for the MSS
8 Discussion and conclusions

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