The African world-view, its understanding of adolescence and its relevance to this study

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MY INTEREST IN THIS FIELD OF RESEARCH

The previous 12 years I have spent in relationships with many teenagers. The effect that HIV/AIDS has on these children with real faces and real stories has touched my life in many ways. It inspired awareness in me to understand the ways their lives are currently affected and will be affected in future. I would like to be able to respond to these needs and not only be a spectator in their life-long
journey.

POSITIONING

This research will be done, firstly from my position as a Practical Theologian. I use a narrative-based research approach and I further choose to do this research within the post-modern, social-constructionist paradigm. The Narrative metaphor and Social Constructionism forms part of the postmodern world-view. Concepts, with which it is described, are post-structuralism, deconstructionism, an interpretive turn and new hermeneutics (Feedman and Combs 1996:14). This research also falls within the Qualitative Research paradigm.

Practical Theology

During my years of study at the University of Pretoria, I was confronted with different schools of thinking, coming from different disciplines of theology. Often I felt lost between all the major streams of theological thinking. When I started my ministry as a young woman in an inner city congregation, a lot of the theological confusion was pushed backwards and I was confronted with real-life prejudice, old school thinking, patriarchy, discourses of rich and poor, discrimination with many faces, church politics, etc.

Narrative approach

The Narrative Approach to research is a comfortable way to be true to post-modern social-constructionism as described by Müller, Van Deventer and Human (2001:76): “For us, the aim of research is not to bring about change, but to listen to the stories and to be drawn into those stories. While the structuralistic researcher has objectivity in mind by trying to be an observer from outside, and by trying to bring about change from the outside, the narrative researcher has subjective integrity in mind and strives for participatory observation”.

CHAPTER ONE: POSITIONING AND RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
1 MY INTEREST IN THIS FIELD OF RESEARCH
2 POSITIONING
2.1 Practical Theology
2.2 Narrative Approach
2.2.1 Co-researcher
2.2.2 Position of the researcher
2.2.3 Focus of the research
2.3 Post-modern paradigm
2.4 The social-constructionist paradigm
2.5 Qualitative Research
2.6 Care
3 THE CONTEXT OF THE RESEARCH
4 RESEARCH METHOD
4.1 The action field of the story
4.1.1 The action or fields of action
4.1.2 Possible questions
4.1.3 Data collection
4.2 Background of the story
4.3 Story Development
4.4 Climax of the story
4.5 Ending of the story
5 IN CLOSING
5.1 Index
CHAPTER TWO: UNHEARD STORIES OF ADOLESCENTS
1 THE STORY OF THE INNER CITY AND PEN
1.1 Four areas of ministry
1.2 PEN believe
2 MY JOURNEY WITH THE CO-RESEARCHERS
2.1 Putting plans into action
2.2 How did I choose the co-researchers
2.3 How did I go about capturing information
2.4 How did I invite people to become co-researchers
2.4.1 Names of the main group of teenagers
2.5 How did I involve the parents
2.6 Sessions with the care institutions in the area
2.7 Sessions with the Sediba Hope Aids Center personnel
2.8 Sessions with the Academic Reflection Teams
2.9 My first encounter: baby research with baby teens
2.9.1 Session 1
2.9.2 My reflection
2.10 The research team
2.10.1 Session 2
2.10.2 My reflection
2.10.3 Session 3
2.10.4 My reflection
2.10.5 Session 4
2.10.6 My reflection
2.10.7 Session 5
2.10.8 My reflection
2.10.9 Session 6
2.10.10 My reflection
2.10.11 Session
2.10.12 The drama script
2.10.13 My reflection
3 SOME REFLECTION THAT WILL GUIDE THE REST OF MY THESIS
4 IN CLOSING
CHAPTER THREE: WEAVING THE BACKDROP: MIXING DIFFERENT VOICES TO COME TO A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING VOICES TO COME TO A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING
1 RESEARCH DONE IN AFRICA
1.1 Understanding world-view
1.2 The African world-view, its understanding of adolescence and its relevance to this study
1.3 An African world-view in an narrative, socio-constructionist approach
1.4 African Theology
2 THE DISCOURSE OF MULTI-CULTURALITY
3 THE INNER CITY OF PRETORIA: TRANSITIONAL DISCOURSES
4 DISCOURSES ON HISTORICAL INFLUENCE IN PRETORIA
4.1 Focusing on the inner city
4.2 The Dutch Reformed Church Bosman Street
5 THE ROLE AFRICAN FAMILIES PLAY IN BUILDING VALUES IN YOUNG PEOPLE
6 DISCOURSES ABOUT ADOLESCENCE
6.1 General adolescent discourses
6.2 Discourses about young people living in the inner city
6.3 Discourses of my co-researchers about adolescence
6.4 In the narrative paradigm, a new description of adolescence is required
7 CARE DISCOURSES
7.1 Young people caring about themselves and their future
7.2 The message sent by the media
7.3 Medical care provided by the government
7.4 Illness discourses
7.5 Healing discourses
7.6 Caring about care
8 SEX DISCOURSES IN AFRICA
9 IN CLOSING
CHAPTER 4: THE CIRCULAR MOVEMENT IN THE PROCESS OF INTEGRATING HEARD STORIES AND LISTENING TO NEW STORIES INTEGRATING HEARD STORIES AND LISTENING TO NEW STORIE
1 OTHER STORIES OF YOUNG PEOPLE IN SOUTH AFRICA
2 LISTENING TO THE STORIES OF CARE INSTITUTIONS AND HOW YOUNG PEOPLE EXPERIENCED IT
3 DISCUSSIONS WITH THE SEDIBA HOPE AIDS CENTER PERSONNEL
4 FEEDBACK FROM THE REFLECTION TEAMS
4.1 Reflection team 1
4.2 Reflection team 2
5 VOICES IN MY HEAD AND AIDS IN MY FACE
5.1 My understanding of the church and my own challenge
5.2 An African world-view meeting globalization
5.2.1 Globalization in the inner city of Pretoria
5.2.2 Young people experiencing globalization
5.2.3 Is it love at first sight, or will it end in divorce
5.3 I see AIDS in my face, but who cares?
5.3.1 Care narratives
5.3.1.1 Weingarten
5.3.1.2 Pienaar
5.3.1.3 Baart
5.3.2 Care narratives developed from this research
5.3.2.1 Fearful care
5.3.2.2 Paralyzing care
5.3.2.3 Legal care
5.3.2.4 Nurturing care
5.3.2.5 Communal care
5.3.2.6 Present care
5.3.2.7 Advocative care
5.3.2.8 Storying care
6 COLLECTING MY THOUGHTS
6.1 New places of understanding
7 IN CLOSING
CHAPTER 5: OUTCOME OF MY RESEARCH
1 THE PROCESS OF ARRIVING AT THESE OUTCOMES
2 SOME OF THE UNIQUE and LESS UNIQUE OUTCOMES OF THE GROUP SESSIONS
2.1 The power of spiritual discourses
2.2 Individual stories
2.3 Reframing
2.4 Therapeutic outcomes
2.5 Learning to be “HIV positive”
2.6 The reality of an “HIV negative” world
2.7 Living with “AIDS in my face”
2.8 Descriptions of the reality of the lack of accessible health care for young people
2.9 Descriptions of the reality of the inner city context and
of growing up in communities of violence
2.10 “Love them enough to talk about sex”
2.11 Silent narratives PAR
2.12 The drama
2.13 Institutions
3 NEW PLACES OF UNDERSTANDING
3.1 African knowledge as a resource for care narratives
3.2 Academic outcome
3.3 A narrative description of adolescence
3.4 Hearing the reframed discourses of young people about themselves
3.5 Valuing the role young people can and must play in co-constructing their own futures
3.6 Taking young people serious
3.7 Practical Theological implications
3.8 A narrative outcome
3.9 A personal outcome
4 IN CLOSING
CHAPTER 6: GROWING UP: IN PERSON AND IN RESEARCH
1 THINGS I WOULD HAVE DONE DIFFERENTLY
2 AN ETHICAL REFLECTION
3 FUTURE FOCUSES FOR RESEARCH
4 CRITICAL EVALUATION OF THE RESEARCH PROCESS
4.1 Reliability
4.2 Validity
4.3 Credibility
4.4 Transferability
4.5 Consistency
4.6 Confirmability
5 NARRATIVE EVALUATION QUESTIONS
5.1 Did the research create space for new stories and for restorying
PAR. HEADING
5.2 Did the researcher have integrity in listening to and reporting the stories
5.3 Did the researcher interpret or ask for interpretation
5.4 Did the research process bring transformation/ reframing
5.5 How is the researcher going to disseminate the research
6 IN CLOSING WORDS OF THANKS
BIBLIOGRAPHY

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THE UNHEARD STORIES OF ADOLESCENTS INFECTED AND AFFECTED BY HIV/AIDS ABOUT CARE AND/OR THE LACK OF CARE

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